THOUGHTS: The Last Tiger in Haiti at Berkeley Rep

Laurie (Jasmine St. Clair) tells a tale to Joseph (Reggie D White), Emmanuel (Clinton Roane), and Rose (Brittany Bellizeare). / Photo: Jim Carmody

Laurie (Jasmine St. Clair) tells a tale to Joseph (Reggie D White), Emmanuel (Clinton Roane), and Rose (Brittany Bellizeare).  Photo Credit: Jim Carmody

What is a story? What is its purpose? A story can entertain or educate. It can comfort or unsettle. It can foster divisions or forge connections. A good story can do many of these things at once. The Last Tiger in Haiti is a very good story. Continue reading

THOUGHTS: It Can’t Happen Here at Berkeley Rep

ICHH ensemble

Cast members in the world premiere of It Can’t Happen Here at Berkeley Rep. Seated: Anna Ishida and Tom Nelis. Standing, left to right: Gerardo Rodriguez, Gabriel Montoya, William Thomas Hodgson, Deidrie Henry, Scott Coopwood, Will Rogers, Alexander Lydon, Carolina Sanchez, Mark Kenneth Smaltz, and Sharon Lockwood.
Photo credit: Kevin Berne/Berkeley Repertory Theatre

It Can’t Happen Here was written in a United States still reeling from the Great Depression. Fascism was on the rise in Europe, and there were fears that it would cross the Atlantic.

Senator Huey Long of Louisiana had broken with his party– as well as President Roosevelt– over the New Deal, and he was poised to run as a third party candidate with the support of a fiery, anti-Semitic radio personality, Father Charles Coughlin. Author Sinclair Lewis and his wife Dorothy Thompson, a political reporter, were among those concerned about a possible dictatorship should Roosevelt lose. And thus was born the book that was then adapted into a play. Continue reading

THOUGHTS: John Leguizamo’s Latin History for Morons

Latin History blackboard

Award-winning playwright, actor, and performer John Leguizamo in the world premiere of Latin History for Morons at Berkeley Rep.
Photo courtesy of Kevin Berne/Berkeley Repertory Theatre

John Leguizamo opens his new one-man show with a bit about his son getting bullied at his middle school. The bully comes from a long line of cops and veterans, or, as he puts it, “heroes.” To boost his son’s spirits and maybe his social standing, and because, as it turns out, his son actually has to write a paper about the subject to graduate 8th grade, Leguizamo decides to find a Latin American hero for his son to be proud of.

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THOUGHTS: aubergine at Berkeley Rep

Ray and Lucien

(l to r) Tyrone Mitchell Henderson (Lucien) and Tim Kang (Ray) in Julia Cho’s Aubergine at Berkeley Rep.
Photo courtesy of kevinberne.com

aubergine opens with a single character, Diane (Safiya Fredericks), on a bare stage. Her appearance, and her monologue, could represent the next two hours: lean, contemplative, and full of food and familial relationships.

Ray (Tim Kang) is a chef whose relationship with his immigrant father (Sab Shimono) could be described as strained at best. But now his father is dying, and Ray is his primary caregiver.

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THOUGHTS: Disgraced at Berkeley Rep

Dinner party - Disgraced

(l to r) Bernard White (Amir), Nisi Sturgis (Emily), Zakiya Young (Jory), and J. Anthony Crane (Isaac) in Ayad Akhtar’s Disgraced, an engrossing and combustible drama that probes the complexity of identity, at Berkeley Rep.
Photo credit: Liz Lauren

It seems Pakistani-American Amir Kapoor (Bernard White) is living the American Dream. He has an Upper East Side apartment complete with a balcony; a beautiful, blonde, artist wife Emily (Nisi Sturgis); and he is poised to make partner at his corporate law firm. But one New York Times story, and an explosive dinner party with his co-worker Jory (Zakiya Young) and her husband Isaac (J. Anthony Crane) threatens to shatter everything that he has worked for.

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THOUGHTS: Head of Passes

Head of Passes 2

Photo courtesy of kevinberne.com

Head of Passes is the place at the southernmost tip of Louisiana where the mouth of the Mississippi River branches off into the Gulf of Mexico. It is remote and unpredictable, making it an apt setting for this emotional play about faith and family.

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THOUGHTS: X’s and O’s: A Football Love Story

XO2_lrI should preface this piece by saying that I don’t really watch football. Maybe the occasional Superbowl, but even then I’m mostly eating and socializing. But in watching X’s and O’s, it didn’t matter that I’m not a football fan. Ultimately that wasn’t really the point.

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